Peak time for serious injury or death for motorcyclists is during June and July - RSA research

‘The dead could be anyone who gets behind the wheel this weekend’, says Minister Jack Chambers

Motorcyclists have been warned that the peak time for serious injury or death is in June or July, according to research from the Road Safety Authority.

The report found that overall most serious collisions involving motorcyclists were recorded between May and September.

Eight in ten motorcycle casualties were injured in daylight, with one third (34 per cent) of casualties injured between 4pm and 8pm.

Sunday was highlighted as the most dangerous day of the week with 20 per cent of casualties occurring on that day.

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In the five years to 2023, males accounted for all fatalities, while nine in 10 of those seriously injured were also male.

Junctions, particularly T-junctions, motorcyclists overtaking and right turning movements were all highlighted as risk factors.

Chief executive of the RSA Sam Waide said in the five-year period to 2023, 105 motorcyclists were killed and 921 were seriously injured. He called for motorcyclists to be “more observant” and for motorists to “take that second glance” before manoueuering.

Mr Waide said the reduction in the rate of road deaths over April and May could be attributed “in part” to Garda Commissioner Drew Harris’ order that gardaí do at least 30 minutes of roads policing activity each day.

Assistant Garda Commissioner Paula Hilman said “certainly we have seen that which is a positive. But I also think to is that combination of using evidence-based data to deploy our gardaí, and education of the public.

She said the nine new static speed cameras would be followed in the new year with 100 more. Before the end of this year three new average speed-over-distance cameras would be in place on the N5; N3 and N2 routes, at Swinford Co Mayo, Butlers Bridge Co Cavan and Slane Co Meath respectively. Ms Hilman said the aim of the cameras was not to raise money in fines, but to reduce the risk of death and serious injury.

Noting that the strong likelihood was that some people would die on the roads this weekend, Minister for State at the Department of Transport, Jack Chambers TD said: “It could be anyone who gets behind the wheel and I would ask people not to be that person that loses their lives, that leaves devastation for families and communities”.

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